Types of Database

A database is a collection of organized data that enables simple modification of data. In this tutorial, we will talk about the various different types of databases in detail and their advantages and disadvantages.

Relational Database

An RDBMS (Relational Database Management System) stores and arranges data points that are connected with each other. In view of the model, a relational database presents data indexes as a collection of tables and gives relational operators the to manipulate the data in tabular form. Tables comprise or consist of segments or columns containing at least one data class, and rows, containing a set of data characterized by the category.

A relational database is a collection of data items with pre-defined relationships between them. These items are organized as a set of tables with columns and rows. It become popular in the 1980s, and it gives the best and most flexible way to deal with access to organized/structured data.

Each table has an exceptional or unique identifier, or primary key, which recognizes the information in the table, and each row contains a special instance of data or information for the classes characterized by the columns. The logical connection between various tables can then be laid out or established with the utilization of foreign keys – a field in a table that interfaces with or connect the primary key data of another table. RDBMS frequently employs SQL for collecting information or data for reports and interactive queries. Examples: Oracle, MySQL, Microsoft SQLServer, PostgreSQL, and many more.

RDBMS shows ACID properties:

  • Atomicity
    • All changes to data proceed as though they are a single operation.
  • Consistency
    • All changes to data proceed as though they are a single operation.
  • Isolation
    • The intermediate state of exchange is invisible to different exchanges.
  • Durability
    • After a transaction effectively finishes, changes to data persist and are not scattered, even in that frame of mind of a system failure.
Relational Database
Relational Database

Advantages

  • Despite the fact that a relational database is poor as far as execution, actually its speed is extensively higher due to its straightforwardness and simplicity.
  • Since there are a few tables in a relational database, certain tables can be made to be private.
  • Compared with different kinds of network models, a relational database model is a lot simpler.
  • Dissimilar to different types of databases, a relational database does not require any particular way of getting to the data.
  • In this way, every one of the data which is stored is non-repetitive.

Disadvantages

  • The relational database system is exorbitant or expensive or costly to set up and maintain.
  • The support and maintenance of the relational database become difficult over time because of the expansion of the data.
  • While utilizing the relational database over different servers, its structure changes and becomes hard to deal with.
  • A relational database is involved rows and columns, which requires a ton of physical memory on the grounds that every activity performed depends upon independent storage or capacity.
  • Relational databases can store data in a tabular structure which makes it hard to address complex connections/relationships between objects.

Object Oriented Database

The database combined concepts of object-oriented programming with relational database principles. Let the class as a model, and objects as its instances. These instances share the properties they are derived from the same class. For example, a class of “Car”, the objects of which could be a wheel, break, its color, Tata, Alto, Tesla, etc. Objects are the very fundamental building blocks and an instance of the class, where the type is defined by the user (user-defined).

Object-oriented databases (OODS) are databases that represent data in the form of objects and classes. In object-oriented terminology, an object is a real-world entity, and a class is a collection of objects. In object-oriented programing (OOPS), programming classes have member functions that show the properties of the database class.

The class presents the blueprint or schema for the objects, which defines the behavior methods, and determines the behavior of a class pointers help to get the elements of an object database and build relations between objects.

Object Oriented Database
Object Oriented Database

Advantages

  • Object Oriented Database Management System (OODBMS) permits new data types to be built or worked from an existing one.
  • A single language interface between the Data Manipulation Language and the programming language conquers the impedance mismatch.
  • OODBMS is equipped for storing various different kinds of data.
  • Navigational access from the object is the most widely recognized type of data access in an OODBMS. It is more suitable for taking care of parts explosion, recursive queries, and so on.
  • The tight coupling among data and applications in an OODBMS makes schema or pattern development more possible.

Disadvantages

  • Utilization client of OODBMS is low.
  • Maybe quite possibly the main issue that faces OODBMS sellers is the competition posed by the RDBMS and the arising ORDBMS products or items
  • There is a general absence of norms of OODBMS. There is no universally concurred data model and no standard object-oriented query language.
  • Numerous OODBMSs use locking as the reason for simultaneousness or concurrency control protocol which might influence execution and performance.
  • Query optimization requires a comprehension of the fundamental execution to access the database easily and efficiently. Be that as it may, this compromises the idea of incrustation.

Distributed Database

A distributed database is a database in which the data is stored across the world or in various different physical locations. It is perhaps stored in various PCs situated in a similar physical location or perhaps scattered over a network of interconnected PCs or devices.

A distributed database (DDB) is an integrated collection of databases that is physically distributed across sites in a computer network. In a Distributed database, the data is spread over numerous geographic regions to provide high accessibility and fast access. Examples: Apache Ignite, Apache Cassandra, Apache HBase, Amazon SimpleDB, MongoDB, etc.

System managers or administrators can distribute collections of data across various different multiple physical locations. A distributed database can dwell on coordinated or organized network servers or decentralized independent devices or PCs on the Internet, on corporate intranets/extranets, and so on.

Distributed Database
Distributed Database

Advantages

  • Network transparency: This alludes/refers to the freedom of the client from the operational details of the network.
  • Replication transparency: It makes clients unaware of the presence of duplicates or copies as we realize that duplicates of data might be stored at multiple sites for better accessibility, execution, performance, and reliability.
  • Discontinuity or Fragmentation transparency: It makes clients uninformed about the presence of fragments, vertical or horizontal.
  • At the point when the data is distributed over several sites, one site might fall while different sites keep on working.
  • In a dispersed climate (distributed environment) extension of the system as far as adding more data, expanding database sizes and so on is getting simpler.

Disadvantages

  • Various data designs are utilized in various systems.
  • Different DBMS items are utilized in various systems which expands the complexity of the system.
  • Network traffic is expanded, in light of the fact that most queries stay on a site’s LAN rather than using the organization’s WAN.
  • Overseeing or managing the system index (catalog) is a difficult task (Every database stores each information regarding its objects. This data, known as metadata, is likewise stored as rows and columns of a table. The collection of this metadata is stored in the system list or catalog).

Cloud Database

A database is accessed, deployed, and built in a cloud environment, private, public, or half and hybrid cloud. It has two organization or deployment models:

1] Database as a service (DBaaS)

It’s a database in which an organization contracts with a cloud administration supplier through a charge-based membership administration or service. The service provider offers the end-client real-time operational, maintenance, administrative, and database management tasks to the end user.

2] Traditional Database

Basically, the same as an onsite, in-house oversaw, or managed database — with the exception of infrastructure provisioning. For this situation, an organization buys virtual machine space from a cloud administration supplier, and the database is sent to the cloud. It is valuable for early age associations or organizations, small size organizations.

Cloud Database
Cloud Database

Advantages

  • Cloud databases offer various chances to diminish or reduce risk across the business, especially for DBaaS models.
  • On the off chance that the organization chooses not to operationalize a project, it can easily forsake the task or projects and continue on toward the following development and innovation.
  • Cloud databases can be set up and decommissioned rapidly — making testing, approving, and operationalizing new business thoughts, and ideas simple and quick.
  • While utilizing a cloud database, there’s a compelling reason to need to arrange hardware or spend time waiting for shipments, installation, and network setup when another item is in the development queue.

Disadvantages

  • The initial expense of hosting services for your database deployments can be lower than growing your business’ current servers. Be that as it may, as your service needs grow, expenses or costs can rise – in some cases strongly.
  • When your business has picked a cloud service provider, moving your foundation to an alternate cloud service tends to be complex.
  • The overall security of the cloud foundations available from leading sellers is solid. Yet, no system is entirely immune to assault/attack. Hosting sensitive data online consistently creates the chance of a data break or breach.

Centralized Database

It is a collection of data in a single location open from various places. The fundamental capability or function of a centralized database management system is to give facilities and give access to every one of the associated PCs which satisfy all necessities mentioned by any single node.

All information and data are stored in a single centralized database management system. The PC system which satisfies the prerequisites of all the associated devices is known as a server and different devices are known as clients.

Centralized Database
Centralized Database

Advantages

  • Data may also be more straightforward to sort out or organize in a single location.
  • Queries can be quick.
  • In a database upgrade to deal with more data, servers can be added to the database site without any problem.
  • A centralized database can also be more straightforward physically genuinely.
  • It is also possible to set up a very powerful PC security system to prevent unapproved or unauthorized access.

Disadvantages

  • It can also be truly defenseless in the event that something happens to it and backup has not been performed or the current backup is obsolete or outdated.
  • A centralized database will in general make bottlenecks in the event that few clients perform write operations.
  • On the off chance that different clients attempt to access and deal with queries toward the server all the while then it turns out to be very hazardous/problematic for the exhibition or performance.

End User Database

An end-user database empowers storing information made by an end-user. Any database which permits the end-user to make and oversee or manage data goes under this category. This implies that the user or client can straightforwardly interact with and control the database and the data that is stored in it. For convenience, the end user is given an interactive client (devoted software, command line interface, GUI, and so on).

End User Database
End User Database

Advantages

  • The client is just aware of the item which might be a product or software or application.
  • The end client is normally not worried about the transaction or activities done at different levels.
  • This helps in quick development.

Disadvantages

This is a common database that is specifically or intended designed for the end client.

Graph Database

Graph databases are meticulously designed (purpose-built) to store and explore connections among objects. Connections are top-notch residents/citizens in graph databases, and a large portion of the worth of graph databases is derived from these connections. Graph database use nodes to store data elements/entities, and edges to store connections between entities/substances.

A graph can be navigated along specific edge types or across the whole graph. In graph databases, traversing the joins or connections is exceptionally fast on the grounds that the connections between nodes are not determined at query times but are continued in the database. Graph databases have benefits when you want to make connections among data and quickly query these connections.

Graph Database
Graph Database

Advantages

  • With quick graph queries, you can recognize that, for example, a potential buyer is utilizing a similar email address and credit card as included in a known fraud case.
  • With a graph database, you can involve connections or use relationships to process financial and buy transactions in near-real-time.
  • Graph databases can also assist/help you with effectively recognizing relationship patterns, for example, various individuals related to an individual email address, or numerous individuals having a similar IP address but residing in different physical addresses.
  • With graph databases, you can store a graph connection between data classes, for example, client interests, companions, and buy history.

Disadvantages

  • Utilizing a graph database alone isn’t an MDM (Master Data Management) arrangement.
  • Graph databases are not perfect at value-based or transactional use cases.
  • Graph databases don’t make better connections. They simply give speedy information recovery to associated information.
  • For the most widely recognized graph databases, you need to store every one of the data/information on one server.
  • Graph databases are not enhanced for huge volume examination inquiries typical of data warehousing.

Network Database

A network database depends on a network data model, which permits each record to be connected with different essential records and numerous primary records. Network databases permit you to make an adaptable model of connections between entities.

Network alludes/refers to relations between various data substances or entities. A network database depends on a traditional hierarchical database, with the exception of it permitting each object to have multiple parents rather than a single parent.

Network databases can be addressed as a graph, characterized by a pattern or schema, which is a list of data nodes and the connections between them. This gives a data structure that, in a regular relational database, must be accessed by derivation.

Network Database
Network Database

Advantages

  • The network model can handle the one-to-many and many-to-many connections which are a real help in modeling real-life situations.
  • The network model is conceptually simple and easy to design.
  • getting data is easier and more flexible than the hierarchical model.
  • The network model does not allow a member to exist without an owner.
  • The network model is better than the hierarchical model in isolating the programs from the complex physical storage details.

Disadvantages

  • There’s a presence of operational inconsistencies as there is a utilization of pointers for the route or navigation which further prompts complex execution.
  • The composition/schema or the design of this database is exceptionally mind-boggling as al the records are kept up with by the utilization of pointers.
  • This model flops in achieving structural independence despite the fact that the network database model is fit for accomplishing data freedom or independence.
  • This model has no extent of automated inquiry improvement or optimization.

Hierarchical Database

It is a database model in which the data is organized in a hierarchical or progressive tree way. As it is organized based on the hierarchy, each record of the data tree ought to have something like one parent, with the exception of the child records in the last level, and each parent should have at least one child record. The Data can be accessed by completely finishing the classified structure, consistently starting from the Root or the first parent.

The thought behind hierarchical database models is helpful for a specific type of data storage, however, it isn’t very flexible. It is restricted to a few quite certain purposes (specific uses). Hierarchical models check out where the essential focal point of information gathering is on a concrete hierarchy like a list of business departments, assets, or individuals that will be generally connected with specific higher-level primary data elements.

Hierarchical Database
Hierarchical Database

Advantages

  • The first database model offered the data security that is given by the DBMS.
  • In view of Hierarchal structure, the connections between the layers.
  • It is extremely productive when the database contains an enormous/large number of 1 connections and when the client requires countless transactions.
  • It’s extremely quick to get to information at present at the highest point of tree storage.
  • Enormous base with proven technology.

Disadvantages

  • Complex (user requires the representation of database).
  • One parent for every child.
  • Navigation across the tree-based data is complicated.
  • Lack of structural independence.
  • Numerous excessive connections are not upheld or supported.
  • Data independence.
  • Data should be organized in a hierarchical manner without compromising the – data.

NoSQL Database

NoSql can deal with large volumes of quickly changing, unstructured data in unexpected ways in comparison to a relational database with rows and tables. NoSQL DBMS compromise consistency for accessibility, speed, and partition tolerance. NoSql DBMSs utilize paired configuration of Javascript Object Notation (BSON) to store information in a database. The data is stored in records/documents, which in turn are stored in a collection.

Most NoSQL stores need genuine ACID(Atomicity, Consistency, Isolation, Durability) transactions however a couple of databases, like MarkLogic, Aerospike, and so forth have made them fundamental or central to their plans. Most NoSQL databases offer an idea of possible consistency in which database changes are propagated to all nodes so queries for data probably won’t return refreshed/updated data right away or could result in reading data that isn’t precise.

NoSQL Database
NoSQL Database

Advantages

  • They are developer friendly.
  • They are capable of storing unstructured, semi-structured, or structured data.
  • NoSQL databases make the most of the cloud to convey zero free time or downtime.
  • They empower simple updates to patterns/schema and fields.
  • They can deal with enormous volumes of information fast with scale-out engineering/architecture.

Disadvantages

  • Reinforcements are a drawback in NoSQL databases. However some NoSQL databases give devices to backup, they are not sufficiently experienced to guarantee a legitimate total data backup solution.
  • No standard characterizes the principles and roles of NoSQL databases. The design and inquiry languages of NoSQL databases generally change between various NoSQL products.
  • NoSQL puts versatility and execution first yet with regards to the consistency of the information NoSQL doesn’t take a lot of thought.

Commercial Database

A commercial database is created and kept up with by a commercial association or organization that is for the most part made accessible to clients and expected clients. As far as free software and source accessibility, it’s inverse to DBMSs like MySql, Postgres, and so on. Examples are OracleDB, EnterpriseDB, and so on. They are frequently connected with premium administrations or services, for example, active customer support, better up times and access speed (cloud-deployed), and so on.

Commercial Database
Commercial Database

Advantages

  • The association/organization might give extra scaling elements as features and limits.
  • Commercial DBMS software gives organizations offer professional help stretched out to clients.

Disadvantages

  • Charging could scale as does the database.
  • Require buying.
  • DBMS relocation could be a reason for concern.
Ayush
Ayush

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